Opinion

A November Event Celebrating Arta Weavers

The first time I walked into A la Campagna antique store on E. Broadway, I wanted to live there.  It was the very kind of store my mother Alice would have loved exploring.  Antiquing was her escape for as far back as I can remember and that part of her is resident in me.  The

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An Infamous College Basketball Scandal Revisited

This week, “The City Game:  Triumph, Scandal, and a Legendary Basketball Team,”—a book chronicling a sports scandal like no other in college basketball history—will appear in bookstores around the country.  The author, Matthew Goodman, is a native of Brooklyn, one of New York City’s most fascinating boroughs.  This March when Kit and I were in

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Packing for a Journey Around the World

In a week, I’ll be speaking to MU Professor Doug Hurt’s “Geography of Tourism and Travel” class.  We’ll be discussing an assigned non-fiction book by author Matthew Goodman, “Eighty Days:  Nellie Bly and Elizabeth Bisland’s History-Making Race Around the World.”  I’ll begin by asking the class what the two women packed in their luggage for

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Reflections Under a Hunter’s Moon

For me, October is about new beginnings.  It’s the month Kit and I moved from Washington, DC to Missouri in 1988.  It’s a month of seasonal transition, brightened by a Hunter’s Moon, autumn festivals and jack-o’-lanterns.  It’s a time to carve pumpkins, gather ripe persimmons, harvest soybeans, and prepare for the first frost.  Around the

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In My October Kitchen

October days at Boomerang Creek begin with chilly dawn walks and end with fiery orange sunsets that set the woods ablaze. In the woods, there is a deep moan as wind soughs through thick foliage, like the soft moan of a gentle surf. Sough, pronounced in American English like soft; in British English as in

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From the Kalahari to Where the Crawdads Sing

In 1974, Mark and Delia Owens met in a protozoology class at the University of Georgia. A visiting scientist told them about Africa’s disappearing wilderness, reporting “More than two-thirds of its wildlife had already been eliminated, pushed out of its habitats by large ranches and urban sprawl.” And in the southern regions, “thousands of predators

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October’s Brilliant Arrival

With October’s arrival, it is the power of air that shapes the pattern of movement on the land. For days, the air seems to stop moving altogether. To hang dry and heavy around all that it touches. To steal energy and drive good intentions back indoors in search of cool, conditioned air. At night, spiders

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Impeachment: Why Clinton’s didn’t happen but Trump’s will

Dear Editor, More than a few political talk shows have compared Bill Clinton’s impeachment attempt to Donald Trump’s. The difference is this. Clinton’s actions were deemed unethical, but were ultimately determined to be of a personal nature and not harmful to the security to the United States. President Donald Trump has been accused in the

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Letters to the Editor: It’s not manatory to like Trump

Dear Editor, Mr. Naughton continues to astound me with his dribble and rhetoric. He is a master at dredging through past events, cherry picking the ones that allows him the luxury of inserting his slanted opinion. In a not so masterful way Mr. Naughton then pieces together a tapestry in his mind of how these

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Make America Great Again, 2020

In 2003, my son Alex was just two-years-old, but I was already thinking about the possibility of him being sent to fight in the Middle East in a never-ending War on Terror. That prospect still scares me to death nearly 17 years later. When U.S. intelligence determined that the Taliban-controlled government of Afghanistan had been

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